Sunday, September 11, 2011

The Limits of Critical Thinking” will be presented by Michael Carter at the Sunday, September 18th meeting of the Ethical Society of Asheville, 2:00-3:30 PM, held in the YMI Cultural Center, 39 South Market Street in the Ray Auditorium. Carter, former hospital chaplain and current Diversity Officer for Mission Hospitals reminds us that Psychologist B.F. Skinner once said, "Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten" and T.S. Elliott asked, “Where is the wisdom lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge lost in wisdom?” Carter postulates that our postmodern information culture forces us to become overly cerebral, but it really doesn't teach us to think, much less to feel. So, the question really becomes--- How are we educating our children? There will be a discussion period following the presentation. Following the meeting, there will be time for informal conversation and refreshments. All are welcome! For more information contact: asheville@aeu.org, www.aeu.org, ethicalsocietyasheville@gmail.com or 828 687-7759 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 828 687-7759 end_of_the_skype_highlighting .

The Ethical Society of Asheville is a humanist, educational, philosophical, non-theistic alternative to traditional religions. It is affiliated with the American Ethical Union, which is affiliated with the American Humanist Association and the International Humanist and Ethical Union. Members are inspired by the ideal that the supreme aim of human life is working to create a more humane society. Their commitment is to the worth and dignity of the individual and to treating each human being so as to bring out the best in him or her.

Monday, August 29, 2011

Colloquy - This Sunday, September 4th

YMI Cultural Center, 39 South Market Street (downtown Asheville), 3rd floor Board Room

After entering the front door there is an elevator on the right before you reach the stairs.

Please save parking spaces on the street in front of the building for vehicles with handicapped tags.

The Limits of Critical Thinking

"The Limits of Critical Thinking" will be presented by Michael Carter at the Sunday, September 18th meeting of the Ethical Society of Asheville, 2:00-3:30 PM, held in the YMI Cultural center, 39 South Market Street in the Ray Auditorium (2nd floor - After entering the front door an elevator will be to your right before you reach the stairway.) Carter, former hospital chaplain and current Diversity Officer for Mission Hospitals reminds us that Psychologist B.F. Skinner once said "Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten" and T.S. Elliott asked, "Where is the wisdom lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge lost in wisdom?" Carter postulates that our postmodern information culture forces us to become overly cerebral, but it really doesn't teach us to think, much less to feel. So the question really becomes--- How are we educating our children? There will be a discussion period following the presentation. Following the meeting, there will be time for informal conversation. All are welcome! For more information contact: asheville@aeu.org, www.aeu.org or ethicalsocietyasheville@gmail.com.

Colloquy

1st Sundays - Ethical Society of Asheville


Humanists and Ethical Culturists value the connections we make with other people and the gift of life itself. Colloquy provides a space for us to forge these connections and contemplate together those things that make life unique and precious.



Meeting the first Sunday of each month at 2:00 p.m., Colloquy offers one and a half hour of self-reflection and contemplation within a nurturing, group environment. Participants use readings, music and quiet sharing to reflect on a theme; meditation on the theme often invites gentle exploration of life's questions.



Colloquy was created at the Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island by Arthur Dobrin, the Leader (now Leader Emeritus of the Long Island congregation. Joy McConnell, our Consulting Leader introduced the program in the St. Louis Society in 1997 and introduced it here June 2010.



Format: Each Colloquy discussion centers on a particular theme. Groups consider such topics as awareness, serenity, character, transitions and memory. Facilitators and participants derive Colloquy topics and inspiration from a number of sources including:



  • Spelling God with Two O's by Arthur Dobrin


  • A Treasury of Kahlil Gibran by Kahlil Gibran

"We should not overlook the role played by our feelings and emotions in prompting us to live ethical lives... Reason may guide us in doing the right thing, but it is caring - it is feeling - that motivates us to reach out and do good in the first place. It is our capacity for feeling that makes us moral people."


- Fritz Williams, "The Heart of Humanist," September 27, 1998 Platform Address





Sunday, July 12, 2009

The Ethical Society of Asheville is a humanist, educational, philosophical, non-theistic alternative to traditional religions. It is affiliated with the American Ethical Union, which is affiliated with the American Humanist Association and the International Humanist and Ethical Union. Members are inspired by the ideal that the supreme aim of human life is working to create a more humane society. Their commitment is to the worth and dignity of the individual and to treating each human being so as to bring out the best in him or her.
The Ethical Society of Asheville is a humanist, educational, philosophical, non-theistic alternative to traditional religions. It is affiliated with the American Ethical Union, which is affiliated with the American Humanist Association and the International Humanist and Ethical Union. Members are inspired by the ideal that the supreme aim of human life is working to create a more humane society. Their commitment is to the worth and dignity of the individual and to treating each human being so as to bring out the best in him or her.